Saturday, 20 July 2013

Traffic Building For Beginner Bloggers

So, you're a beginner blogger, and you you want to learn some traffic building methods to get visitors to your posts. I assume that you are, or else, why would you be reading this? You probably found this post in a Google search, or if not there, you might have found it in a search on the site, or through another large site such as Facebook or Twitter.

There are many more ways than that, but let's first start out with the most important sites that get the most traffic according to Alexa traffic statistics. Some of the most visited sites in the world in no particular order are Facebook, Google, You Tube, Wikipedia, Twitter, Blogger, Yahoo, Bing, and the fastest growing site in the world currently is Google Plus.

 It aims to be a cross between Facebook and Twitter, with more functionality than either, and because Google owns it, many people are expecting it to have as much importance for rankings and traffic as any of the other large sites.

It succeeds in some ways, and fails in others, but I'm sure it will will be right up there at the top of the list in terms of importance of the top ten most visited sites list eventually, You have other new sites like Pinterest, Instagram and old favourite social bookmarking/social networking sites like Linked In, Stumble Upon and Yahoo Answers.

 I have at times gotten large amounts of traffic by sending messages, or posting messages naturally, but be sure to keep an eye on the terms and conditions of the sites as you don't want to spam links to your site on social media sites, or anywhere for that matter. Google is cracking down on spam, and the social media sites themselves are becoming more vigilant to try to protect their users from an endless barrage of nonsensical messages and badly written blurbs designed to push a link message down the throats of anyone who will listen.

 How To Drive Traffic On Social Media Without Spamming 


The best way I have found to get traffic from social media is to produce quality content, keeping the SEO and keywords of the pages in mind. For example, if you're going to make a Facebook page, I would suggest that you do careful keyword research, and come up with a title for your page that has a decent amount of exact match search volume on the Google keyword tool.

If you only give your page the title of your company brand name, or your own name, that means it will only attract new customers if you are famous enough to have people searching for you by name.

Most people are not anywhere near famous enough to have their name have a exact match search volume of thousands a month, so you have to look for something that has those figures, and that also has low competition on Google. To find out if a phrase has competition, try typing it into Google, and check the page rank of all of the first page results using an SEO browser plugin like the free add-ons from SEO Quake, SEO Book, and SEO Powersuite.

These are great tools that do a lot more than just give you the page rank of pages in a Google search, but they are especially good for that. I also use the SEO Spyglass tool in SEO Powersuite to take a look at exactly what back links are leading to my competing sites, so that I can perhaps imitate those links, or to get an idea of what sort of links are still working.

It is not exactly clear what Google is looking for, and how they determine quality, but a lot of it has to do with the original quality writing on a page, and how many words there are.

 Building a Link Pyramid 


It's not hard to understand the concept of a link pyramid, but then some people I have trouble explaining what a back link is at all. To build a great link pyramid, and example would be to write a high quality article on Ezine articles, or HubPages that links to your site, and also to other high authority relevant source sites in the text.

Then, you write high quality articles on sites like InfoBarrel, Go Articles, Triond, Squidoo, Typepad, Blogger, prlog.org, Knoji, Yahoo Contributor Network, etc, which also link out to authority source sites in the text, and which include photos with attribution and a link to the original photo on the source site, if they are not original photos you took yourself.

I generally take my own photos, (using screenshot software), as I am allowed to take a photo of my computer screen, and alter it somewhat, and then it becomes my photo.

You can build it down to to third level, or even the fourth, with a link that leads to a link which leads to a link which links to your site. If you get a realistic looking "expert" page or many of them linking to your site, your site gains authority, and this is more important than the page rank that gets passed along.

Page rank doesn't really mean anything much at all, and hasn't for a long time, but it does mean that there are multiple back links leading to the page, and unless some of those links are damaging spam links, it may be hard to beat a site that has a huge page rank of three or four or higher.

At one point one of my sites got up to a PR 4 level, for a little while, but the most success I've had at gaining a high page rank page was a PR 6 for one of my Facebook pages. It's unbelievable, considering it doesn't really have all that much on it.

Summary 


Anyway, that's some tips on how to build traffic if you are a beginner blogger, or even an experienced blogger. It takes many years to learn, but if you have a passion for what you are writing about, and have the time to learn the technical ropes properly, it can pay off in spades, both financially and in a sense of achievement at gaining millions or readers worldwide.

If you have any questions about anything in this post, or you need help with doing any of the work involved in all of this, or some coaching or advice, send me an email at rowancasey@bigpond.com.

No comments:

Post a Comment